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Hypertension Drug-Driven Deficiencies: Beta Blockers


I hope you found this quick clinical tip helpful!  Beta blockers are one of the most popular drug prescriptions for hypertension or chronically elevated blood pressure.  They are also prescribed for other cardiac challenges such as angina or atrial fibrillation (which is often caused by magnesium deficiency – but that’s another video for another day!).

Looking for clinical fodder to convince your clients of the need to address both melatonin and CoQ10?

For middle-aged and older individuals, I always recommend the ubiquinol form of CoQ10 (vs. ubiquinone) to ensure cellular uptake.  As we age, we lose the ability to convert sufficient ubiquinone into ubiquinol (the active, reduced form).

To answer a question commonly raised about this topic by the healthcare practitioners I coach:  Yes, I do recommend melatonin for my clients who use beta blockers even if they do not have insomnia (again, just a low ~1mg dose).  Clinical research shows that melatonin helps individuals to experience a significantly lower drop in  blood pressure at night (creating what is called a “big dipper”) which reduces pressure on the arterial lining and results in a lower daytime average blood pressure.

If you support many clients with cardiovascular issues and want to feel confident and empowered (and know more than most physicians!) about how to help them overcome the dis-ease in their body, you will love our Cardiovascular Myths and Truths course – one of the most popular here at SAFM.  Available anytime!

9 Questions for “Hypertension Drug-Driven Deficiencies: Beta Blockers”

  1. 3

    In a client who has AI, intestinal permeability, candida overgrowth and is likely not producing enough serotonin, would you try 5-HTP instead of melatonin?

  2. 2
    Sandy says:

    If beta blockers impair COQ10 uptake in cells, is their any benefit to taking COQ10 supplement for person taking beta blocker RX for arrhythmia?

    • 2.1
      SAFM says:

      I believe so -yes. Certainly you should speak with your physician for personal guidance. But in principle, I definitely believe there is value in supporting the body with 100-200mg ubiquinol daily (divided doses) to help ensure the body has an optimal supply for cellular metabolism.

  3. 1
    Daryl Moss says:

    What dose of ubiquinol do you recommend for a 61 year old man who takes statins? I take it from the above information that he also should take melatonin. Thorne makes a product that they recommend instead of statins. Are you familiar with this?

    Thanks!

    • 1.1
      SAFM says:

      This depends on the dose of statins, but typically, I recommend 100-150mg ubiquinol twice daily with foods. While some individuals who take statins also have impaired sleep (especially perhaps with certain types of more lipid-soluble statins that more readily penetrate the blood-brain barrier), the melatonin recommendation above specifically relates to beta blocker drugs. Red yeast rice is a common “natural” alternative to statins, but its mode of action is essentially the same. I prefer to work with clients to get to the true root cause of any cholesterol issues (our Cardiovascular Myths and Truths course explores this in detail), but if overt triage reduction of cholesterol is needed, I usually recommend phytosterols which will bind with cholesterol in the GI tract and prevent reabsorption through the intestinal wall (thus enhancing excretion in the stool) e.g. Pure Encapsulations CholestePure.

      • Daryl Moss says:

        Thanks, Tracy. He takes 40mg of Lipitor daily. Do you think he can get enough melatonin from tart cherry juice?

        • SAFM says:

          Again, statins (i.e. Lipitor) are not known to have a major effect on melatonin synthesis. This article is about the impact specifically of beta blocker medications for hypertension.

    • 1.2
      SAFM says:

      This depends on the dose of statins, but typically, I recommend 100-150mg ubiquinol twice daily with foods. While some individuals who take statins also have impaired sleep (especially perhaps with certain types of more lipid-soluble statins that more readily penetrate the blood-brain barrier), the melatonin recommendation above specifically relates to beta blocker drugs. Red yeast rice is a common “natural” alternative to statins, but its mode of action is essentially the same. I prefer to work with clients to get to the true root cause of any cholesterol issues (our Cardiovascular Myths and Truths course explores this in detail), but if overt triage reduction of cholesterol is needed, I usually recommend phytosterols which are believed to work by reducing reabsorption of cholesterol (from bile) through the intestinal wall (thus enhancing excretion in the stool) e.g. Pure Encapsulations CholestePure. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15166807

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